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Writer's Guidelines

American Craft is aimed at independent thinkers with a keen interest in the creative process. These readers recognize the many design choices they have ineveryday life, from their creative pursuits and the artful objects in their homes and workplaces to the clothing they wear and media they engage with. American Craft helps readers make excellent, constructive, creative choices. The core audience values community, sustainability, quality, and authenticity.

 

Our Ideal Writer

We value freelancers who can write for a general creative audience with clarity and insight. We love good storytelling that explores a craft artist’s struggles, doubts, determination, and triumphs. We like to read about how craft shows up in modern life, particularly if the writing is bright and accessible. When touching on craft theory or history, writers should take special care to write clearly and for a non-academic audience.
 
We work primarily with experienced arts journalists who are thorough and disciplined in their reporting and able to write with depth and nuance. The ideal writer can be counted on to:
 
  • Keep us apprised of changes in story concept at the reporting stage
  • Write to the agreed-upon length 
  • Meet all deadlines
  • Collaborate on editing, responding quickly to questions and suggestions 
  • Help to gather images when necessary

 

The Perfect Pitch

We welcome queries that sum up in a paragraph the most interesting aspects of a story subject. Please email [email protected] with pitches and include the medium (glass, clay, fiber, metal, wood, paper, etc.) in your subject line, along with the department you're aiming for. 
 
Examples of good subject lines:
 
  • QUERY: Clay/Craft in Action
  • QUERY: Paper sculpture/Feature
  • QUERY: Wearable fiber/Product Placement
 
Please also include an image or images with your pitch. The magazine must be not only well written but also visually dazzling; we need to see images before we agree to a story idea.

 

We are interested in:

  • Artists who use unusual materials
  • Artists who’ve traveled unusual paths in their work
  • Emerging artists whose work is remarkable
  • Veteran artists with impressive work that has evolved over a lifetime
  • Artists going through a transition, reaching a pinnacle, or facing a challenge
  • Artists working in collaborative partnerships
  • Artists for whom craft has been a means for healing and learning about life
  • Handmade goods that are stylish, innovative, and affordable
  • Craft that brings together a community for a good purpose
  • Craft that reflects values of sustainability and community
  • People whose work might not be considered studio craft but who bring a sort of craft devotion to their creative pursuits
  • People who’ve collected craft and art objects in a beautiful living space
  • U.S. or foreign locales that offer a number of interesting craft destinations for travelers
  • Galleries that specialize in craft
  • Books, films, and exhibitions of interest to a broad craft-loving audience
  • Schools and organizations advancing craft in interesting ways

 


 

American Craft Departments

 

Front of the Book

  • On Our Radar: Profiles of emerging artists doing remarkable work. 
  • Product Placement: Stylish, inventive, practical, and generally affordable goods in production and the people who design them. 
  • Shop Talk: Q&A with owners of galleries who feature craft objects, discussing their business challenges and successes, the artists they represent, and their clientele. 


Middle of the Book

  • Material Matters: Artist using unusual material to make amazing craft. 
  • Personal Paths: Artist doing very individual—even idiosyncratic—work from a personal motivation.
  • Spirit of Craft: Art forms that might not typically be considered fine craft (e.g., floral arrangement) but may entail the sort of devotion generally associated with craft.
  • Craft in Action: Artists or organizations using craft to make the world better, often reflecting values of community or sustainability.
  • Crafted Lives: Photo-driven Q&A with a person or people living in a particularly creative space.


The Well

  • Features: In-depth prose with a particularly compelling storyline. May be an artist profile or a trend piece encompassing several artists. 


Back of the Book

  • Ideas: Q&A with a thinker or practitioner whose views represent a challenge to the status quo. 
  • Wide World of Craft: Foreign or U.S. travel destination for craft lovers, providing an overall sense of what is distinctive about the city or place.