Health & Hearth

Health & Hearth

Published on Tuesday, January 20, 2015. This article appears in the February/March 2015 issue of American Craft Magazine.
Department Goods
Author Staff
High Gloss ceramics

High Gloss ceramics: Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Ladies & Gentlemen Studio
At Seattle-based Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, Dylan Davis and Jean Lee take a whimsical approach to design. Their Appétit trivets, co-designed with Kevin Do, are made from reclaimed leather scraps, and stamped with patterns resembling tasty foods such as stroopwafel, crackers, and panini.

Byers McCurry Studio
At their Santa Fe studio, ceramists Ed Byers and Holden McCurry create one-of-a-kind prayer towers intended to hold special meaning for the owner. Literally: Each tower is hollow and shipped with a special slip of paper, perfect for stashing meditations or other inspirational messages.

Polka Dot Club
Heirloom-quality toys might sound like a thing of the past – but not if Jennifer Murphy has anything to say about it. The second-generation Minneapolis maker crafts plush animals using soft mohair, as well as toys such as these PDC rattle balls, which are intended to last a lifetime.

High Gloss 
Natalie Herrera lives a dual life: She’s a Manhattan art director by day, a Brooklyn ceramist by night. Her ceramics line High Gloss celebrates geometry with sculptural yet functional objects such as the Tangent pot.

A Little Weather 
It’s fair to say that textile artist Jessica Green knows wool. The North Carolina homesteader raises sheep, spins wool, and forages for natural plant dyes, all before weaving complex patterns into cozy blankets inspired by tradition. 

Julie Lansom 
“I think it is really important to have objects that mean something, that have a soul,” says Parisian maker Julie Lansom, who started selling her handwoven, semi-transparent Sputnik lamps just a few months ago. Each lamp, made in collaboration with a local carpenter, is available in bespoke sizes and colors.